10 Comments / Saturday, September 3, 2011 @ 1:45 AM
Activist Dreamer, Manuel Guerra, is in danger of deportation. Read his story and sign the petition to prevent his deportation! 
25 Comments / Wednesday, August 17, 2011 @ 12:33 PM
27 Comments / Tuesday, August 16, 2011 @ 8:35 PM
"Anti-Immigration Thanksgiving" by Jeff Parker 

"Anti-Immigration Thanksgiving" by Jeff Parker 

7 Comments / Monday, August 15, 2011 @ 11:26 PM

A video to promote the “Do I look illegal?” campaign. All pictures were taken by Alex; check it out!

1 Comments / Thursday, July 28, 2011 @ 11:51 AM
Survey // Interview Questions

So there’s a basic idea of what our site will be addressing. Which comes to the favor we are asking you. We would love it if you can answer some survey questions, and if you would be willing to share your story with us. The survey questions are simple yes/no questions, but you can elaborate more on them so we can analyze your assertions. Here are the survey questions: 

  1. Do you consider yourself an immigrant?
  2. Do you think it’s fair to “compete” with someone who works for less?
  3. Do you think it’s fair that a highly educated person coming to America has to settle for minimum wage because they are not able to pursue his/her career?
  4. Do you think it’s fair that when an illegal immigrant is deported, they get separated from their families?
  5. Do you think that there should be more stricter laws and regulations on immigration?
  6. Do you think that the government has too many regulations on immigration?
  7. Do you consider illegal immigration to be a crime?
  8. Would you be willing to deport an illegal immigrant?
  9. Do you think that the current immigration policies dehumanize immigrants?
  10. Hypothetically, if America were to become a war zone, would you go to another country? Legally or illegally? (in this hypothetical situation, legally means you could quite possibly be separated from your family for decades)

Also, we would love if you can come in contact with us through skype or any chat so we can conduct a personal interview with you. By doing this, this will allow you to have the opportunity to elaborate on the survey questions, but we also would love it if you can answer the following questions if you were willing to do an interview:

  1. When you hear the terms “illegal immigrant,” what are your reactions?
  2. What do you think are the major complications and hardships that immigrants face?
  3. How has immigration affected you?
  4. What are your opinions on the recent immigration laws? Who is suffering?
  5. What’s your definition of “illegal” and “undocumented?” What’s your definition of the term “alien?”  What’s your definition of being an American?
  6. What would you do if you found out that a deserving person was undocumented?
  7. Do you know about the DREAM ACT? If so, what is it all about? Who exactly are these dreamers?
  8. How can people help?

If you would like to help us by answering these questions, please feel free to make a submission with your answers; thank you!

0 Comments / Thursday, July 14, 2011 @ 3:44 PM
Sandra

You can answer the following questions with just yes or no:

  1. Do you consider yourself an immigrant? Yes.
  2. Do you think it’s fair to “compete” with someone who works for less? I’m not exactly sure what this question means, but if it means that people who aren’t illegal immigrants should compete with people who are illegal then I guess. If you need a job, you need a job.
  3. Do you think it’s fair that a highly educated person coming to America has to settle for minimum wage because they are not able to pursue his/her career? No.
  4. Do you think it’s fair that when an illegal immigrant is deported, they get separated from their families? No!!!!!!!!
  5. Do you think that there should be stricter laws and regulations on immigration? No.
  6. Do you think that the government has too many regulations on immigration? Yes.
  7. Do you consider illegal immigration to be a crime? No, people have dreams they want to try to accomplish.
  8. Would you be willing to deport an illegal immigrant? NEVER.
  9. Do you think that the current immigration policies dehumanize immigrants? Definitely.
  10. Hypothetically, if America were to become a war zone, would you go to another country? Legally or illegally? (in this hypothetical situation, legally means you could quite possibly be separated from your family for decades) Yes.

Now for the interview questions:

  1. When you hear the terms “illegal immigrant,” what are your reactions?
    I always think of someone who is willing to risk everything for a better life for themselves or for their family. Just because someone is illegal doesn’t mean they’re bad.
  2. How has immigration affected you?
    Immigration has affected me because I’ve seen a family whose mother had to be deported. It was sad that it had to happen, and I’m glad that the family is ok now, but still, I can’t imagine how that might have been. It’s also affected me because I’m Hispanic. I’ve come across people who just assume I’m illegal because I’m from Mexico. That’s not true, I’m a citizen of the United States and I hate how people are racist and think anyone who is an immigrant is either bad or illegal.
  3. What’s your definition of “illegal” and “undocumented?” What’s your definition of being an American?
    Well for me, being “illegal” or “undocumented” means that you didn’t go through airport security and hope on an airplane. It means that you’re a brave enough to risk crossing through a desert because you didn’t have a passport just to try and find a better life. to me, an American is someone who believes in their dreams and tries to achieve them. To me, being American doesn’t mean that you know the entire history of this country because I’m sure, and I guarantee, there are people out there who were born and raised here who can’t tell you anything other than George Washington was the first president. I believe that there are many illegal people out there who are more American than people who were born here.
  4. What would you do if you found out that a deserving person was undocumented?
    I wouldn’t get them deported. That would be just messed up. I would be a supportive friend if anything ever did happen to them, but that person is still a person and doesn’t deserve to be treated differently.
  5. Do you know about the DREAM ACT?
    Yes, I do, and Arizonians and Alabamians should be more humane. (no offense to the good Arizonians and Alabamians)
0 Comments / Monday, July 11, 2011 @ 12:57 PM

Immigration affects everyone, even those who are seeking protection. Many people seek a asylum in order to escape the discrimination and violence that exist in their mother countries. Immigration immigrants show no mercy; they don’t seem to understand how a simple deportation can destroy the life of an innocent individual. Please, sign the petition to stop the deportation and possible death of Mathe-Karekezi Family - sign the petition

20 Comments / Sunday, July 10, 2011 @ 11:52 PM
allow [him] to tell you [his] story …

" Excluding my father, we were the first in our family history to settle down in Canada. The reason for our “immigration” was my mother’s absurd, over-achieving, adamant, and impetuous personality.

Early in the year of 2002, my mom came across this random idea to send her children to a foreign country to study. At first it was just an idea but then it developed into something bigger, something real. She figured that learning English, the international language, would greatly benefit the future of her children. In addition, she wanted us to be not just Koreans, but members of the international community, to perceive things in the world at a global level, in a bigger scale. My mom has many ideas, ideas that are absurd, and ideas that are ingenious. This idea was kind of both: good but unrealistic. With my father’s small monthly income of around 2000$, the already unusual idea for that time, of sending kids abroad, should not have at all crossed her mind as something plausible.

However, my mother does one thing better than anyone else. Making the impossible possible. First she researched a myriad of schools in both Canada and United States. The reasons my mom chose Canada over the US were because the tuition and cost of living were cheaper and also that Canada was better known to be safer. My mom, at first, also wanted to send my brother and me by ourselves – just the two of us – but then changed her mind after my father, the only soft hearted one in our family, thought it’d be too dangerous for my brother and me to be alone in a foreign country.

The method she used to pick the school I was going to attend wasn’t a logic based evaluation of cost and quality of education but rather a religious leap of faith. She prayed, emailed all the schools, then picked the very first that replied.

After preparing all the documents, my mother, my brother, and I boarded the plane to Canada on September of 2002. I was 8 years old.

There were difficulties in immigrating to and settling down in Canada. There were the obvious language and culture clashes. Further on more problems occurred when my mom wanted to work. In Korea, she had taught English but in Canada, that was no longer the option. There was an option, however, for her to receive a work permit after graduating from certain designated schools. At first she was denied the work permit because the school she had attended did not meet the requirements set by the immigration office. She was once again denied the work permit for the same reason after that although she had, this time, attended a school that met all the requirements. Thankfully, my mom was able to get her application reviewed after contacting the immigration office through some connections she had made during her time at that school. This was quite the miracle because the immigration office generally does not review cases after making their decision. Regardless, my mom was able to receive her work permit.

After looking for jobs and working for couple months she was able to receive a full time permanent job she needed in order to apply for a permanent residence status through a certain type of provincial nominee program. We are currently waiting for the reply regarding the permanent residence application. It’s been about nine years since we first arrived. I have been living in Canada for more than half my life and it feels strange that I am still regarded as a foreigner but at the same time it is understandable because initially, it was not our intention to settle down in Canada. “

0 Comments / Sunday, July 10, 2011 @ 11:19 PM
Kyungjim

Survey Questions:

  1. Do you consider yourself an immigrant? no
  2. Do you think it’s fair to “compete” with someone who works for less? yes
  3. Do you think it’s fair that a highly educated person coming to America has to settle for minimum wage because they are not able to pursue his/her career? no
  4. Do you think it’s fair that when an illegal immigrant is deported, they get separated from their families? no
  5. Do you think that there should be more stricter laws and regulations on immigration? no
  6. Do you think that the government has too many regulations on immigration? yes
  7. Do you consider illegal immigration to be a crime? yes
  8. Would you be willing to deport an illegal immigrant? no
  9. Do you think that the current immigration policies dehumanize immigrants? no
  10. Hypothetically, if America were to become a war zone, would you go to another country? Legally or illegally? (in this hypothetical situation, legally means you could quite possibly be separated from your family for decades) If I lived in America yes.

Interview Questions:

  1. When you hear the terms “illegal immigrant,” what are your reactions? apathetic.
  2. How has immigration affected you? The process of trying to immigrate, or in my case get PR, is complicated and has lots of requirements.  It seems to me that it is designed to let people who have benefits to the country and not necessarily for people who want to find an alternate future in a distinct and separate society.  Therefore, although I have been living in Canada for about 9 years, I still hold temporary visa status
  3. What’s your definition of “illegal” and “undocumented?” What’s your definition of being an American? personal definition of illegal and undocumented immigrants are basically people who don’t have the permission to enter/reside in a specific country and thereby unable to receive government aid or support
  4. What would you do if you found out that a deserving person was undocumented? nothing.  Can’t help and got nothing against the person.
  5. Do you know about the DREAM ACT? no.
0 Comments / Sunday, July 10, 2011 @ 10:24 PM

This is what our website is trying to show: the struggles of immigrants; how the dreams of many are crushed by the current system; how it’s difficult for many to seize various opportunities; and how people fear from telling their fears that they are “undocumented.” And then, you have anti-immigration laws that are passing in various states across the nation. First you had Arizona, and now it’s Alabama. The dreams of many undocumented youth are being crushed. Immigration is not simply about Mexicans in the United States; it’s about everyone in the world. How could you help? What would YOU do if you found out that someone was undocumented. What would YOU do? We’re HUMAN BEINGS. We’re DREAMERS. We’re AMERICANS. We are here to SUCCEED - that is what people need to understand. Immigration reform is needed now! Stop the raids! Stop the discrimination that exists in our society! Stop the racial profiling! Just STOP this nightmare!

0 Comments / Sunday, July 10, 2011 @ 3:27 AM
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